COURT CONSTRUCTION

The Origin, History, Testing and Description of Various Types of Tennis Courts

CLAY

ACRYLIC / ASPHALT / CONCRETE

ACRYLIC / ASPHALT / CONCRETE

SPECIFICATIONS

The descriptions in the table below can be cross-referenced with the classified court surfaces to identify the generic court surface type associated with each product in the list. The descriptions relate only to court construction, and not to performance characteristics.
SURFACE CODETYPEDESCRIPTION
AAcrylic Textured, pigmented, resin-bound coating
BArtificial ClaySynthetic surface with the appearance of clay
CArtificial Grass Synthetic surface with the appearance of natural grass
DAsphalt Bitumen-bound aggregate
ECarpet Textile or polymeric material supplied in rolls or sheets of finished product
FClayUnbound mineral aggregate
GConcrete Cement-bound aggregate
HGrass Natural grass grown from seed
JOther e.g. modular systems (tiles), wood, canvas

NOTES

CONSTRUCTION OF A TYPICAL SOUTH AFRICAN TENNIS COURT



Excavation
The site is surveyed, the court set out, the soil excavated and compacted to the required SABS1200 standards.

Edging
Lay surrounding drainage channels to define the tennis court edge and lead water off the surface.

Sand buffer layer
A 100- to 500mm thick sand buffer laid over existing soil, designed to reduce soil movement in soil containing clay properties.

Base layer
A 100mm thick SABS1200 gravel base, consisting of crushed stone, sieved to specific sizes, providing the structural strength in preparation of the asphalt and latex system.

Asphalt surface
A 25mm thick SABS1200 hot, premixed asphalt with the same expansion and contraction properties as the latex system. Factory premixed, continuously graded asphalt, designed to seal the base and improve the strength even further.


TESTING OF COURTS

Test apparatus consists of:

  • A means of projecting a ball at the specified speed and angle onto the surface without imparting spin of greater than 3 revolutions per second, such as a compressed air-powered ball cannon.

  • A means of monitoring the trajectory of the ball before and after impact such that its horizontal and vertical speeds can be measured with a maximum uncertainty of ± 0.05 m/s (see figure 2).

  • A minimum of three high-specification balls (see table 1).

  • Note: Angle of travel can be deduced from the vertical and horizontal speeds.